Anxiety disorders

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There are various types of anxiety, the most common being the following:

  • General anxiety disorder
  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Phobias

Due to the numerous overlaps with symptoms, until very recently both obsessive compulsive disorder, OCD, and post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD were both considered anxiety disorders until being defined as their own disorders.


Have a read what the NHS have to say about these disorders:

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Generalised Anxiety Disorder

“Anxiety is a feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe.

Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their life – for example, you may feel worried and anxious about sitting an exam, or having a medical test or job interview. During times like these, feeling anxious can be perfectly normal.

However, some people find it hard to control their worries. Their feelings of anxiety are more constant and can often affect their daily lives.”


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Social Anxiety Disorder

“Social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, is a long-lasting and overwhelming fear of social situations.

It’s a common problem that usually starts during the teenage years. For some people it gets better as they get older, although for many it doesn’t go away on its own.

It can be very distressing and have a big impact on your life, but there are ways to help you deal with it.”


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Panic Disorder

“Panic disorder is where you have recurring and regular panic attacks, often for no apparent reason.

Everyone experiences feelings of anxiety and panic at certain times during their lifetime. It’s a natural response to stressful or dangerous situations.

However, for someone with panic disorder, feelings of anxiety, stress and panic occur regularly and at any time.”


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Phobias

“A phobia is an overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling or animal.

Phobias are more pronounced than fears. They develop when a person has an exaggerated or unrealistic sense of danger about a situation or object.

If a phobia becomes very severe, a person may organise their life around avoiding the thing that’s causing them anxiety. As well as restricting their day-to-day life, it can also cause a lot of distress.”